A Local Survivor's Story

Rebecca Purkey, co-owner of Bonnie & Clydes Baked Goods in Springfield, has been overcoming obstacles since she was a baby. When she was three weeks old, a softball hit her in the head, shattering her skull and damaging half her brain. She has struggled with brain injury and epilepsy ever since. Born in Eugene, she also spent some of her childhood in Junction City and Cheshire.

Rebecca’s parents were told she would never walk or talk, and for years, she didn’t. But she began making sounds at age three, and she grew up to become a student athlete and high school graduate.

She has also survived growing up with abuse. Her mother and stepfather were violent with her in all ways—emotionally, physically, and sexually—beginning when she was five years old and increasing with time. Her mother broke Rebecca’s head open several times and beat her almost to death once.

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Hope and Resilience in Brenda Myers-Powell's Story

Brenda Myers-Powell was just a young teenager in Chicago when, pressed by poverty, she sold sex for the first time to make money for her grandmother and her young kids. It didn't take long for pimps to find her and violently seize control of her life. From there, she spent 25 years as a prostitute.

In this recently published article, she chronicles her incredibly difficult decades as a prostitute--the lies, the fear, the violence, the stigma, and the lack of "a way out" that kept her there. She also shares about the series of events that got her into a safe house--the beginning of a new life that started with a place where she could rest and learn to trust others.

Read her story to hear her resounding message:

"I am here to tell you - there is life after so much damage, there is life after so much trauma. There is life after people have told you that you are nothing, that you are worthless and that you will never amount to anything. There is life - and I'm not just talking about a little bit of life. There is a lot of life."

Brenda founded and runs The Dreamcatcher Foundation, an anti-sex trafficking organization in Chicago.  

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Join our prayer team

"No man can do me a truer kindness in this world than to pray for me." -- Charles Spurgeon.

There's a lot happening at Hope Ranch Ministries, and we'd love to share it with you. If you'd like to join us in prayer, feel free to get in touch by phone or e-mail so we can add you to our mailing list for prayer updates. 

info@hoperanchministries.com 
541-255-2151 

Also, don't forget about the September Awareness Training this weekend. It's a great way to find out more about Hope Ranch and meet others who are passionate about abolishing modern-day human trafficking and slavery. 

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What modern-day slavery looks like

Several years ago, Sierra Dawn McClain (then a high school student) wrote this insightful piece after attending a Hope Ranch event. She graciously let us post it on this website:

Oregonian woman escapes human trafficking, becomes abolitionist against modern-day slavery

“I have been a slave. But today…today I’m free.”

Jessica Richardson, formerly a teen prostitute and victim of human trafficking, paused as the audience erupted into applause.

“So many times we think of trafficking as something that only happens overseas. We think of Thailand or Cambodia. We think it can’t happen here, because this is America,” Richardson explained.

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Board member shares her story of involvement

Christine Holub, board member, shares the story of how she became involved with Hope Ranch.

My name is Christine, and I became a member of the board early last summer after working with some of the women, going through Mending the Soul and joining the Task Force. I’d like to take this opportunity to share a little bit about what has brought me to working with Hope Ranch Ministries and the impact it has had on my life.

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Welcome to our new site!

Welcome to our new website!

Hope Ranch has been an active force in Eugene and Springfield for three years already, but we wanted to make it even easier for everyone in the community to learn about what we do and get involved.

Though momentum is growing around the problem of sex trafficking, it is still largely a hidden tragedy, so one goal of our site is education (see Resources for educational materials and Media for local news coverage). Another goal is to help everyone find their niche in the fight against local trafficking (from painting to mentoring, there are lots of things you can do to volunteer). To connect with Hope Ranch in person, come join us at any of our upcoming events. Thanks for checking out the site, and come back often for more news and events.

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